Marty Buckendorf

“I couldn’t have asked for a better place to do rehabilitation,” Marty said of his stay at NCRH.

The day started out as a normal day for Martin “Marty” Buckendorf. Marty, 65, was doing what he loved — working on cars in his garage — when he tripped over some tools and fell. Marty had difficulty moving his left arm and leg and was unable to get up. He called his spouse, but then began having difficulty with his speech.

Flight for Life transported Marty from his home in Laramie, WY to Loveland, CO. There, Marty was diagnosed with an acute right MCA ischemic CVA with hemiparesis and hemisensory loss. Simply put, Marty suffered a stroke that left him with weakness and loss of sensation on his left side.

Marty spent a week in the acute care hospital in Loveland before transferring to Northern Colorado Rehabilitation Hospital (NCRH). Inpatient rehabilitation would be able to address the functional deficits Marty experienced as a result of the stroke. His spouse researched and toured different facilities before choosing NCRH. A friendly environment, state-of-the-art therapy gym and NCRH’s certification in stroke rehabilitation were cited as key factors in that decision.

“I couldn’t have asked for a better place to do rehabilitation,” Marty said, reflecting on the decision. “I made leaps and bounds day-to-day with my progress, thanks to the interdisciplinary team who led my care. My physician, Dr. Arrogante, checked on me frequently and had so much expertise in the management of my stroke diagnosis.”

“Everyone did a wonderful job that cared for me, from the housekeeping staff to the nurses.”

“Strokes can happen to anyone at any time,” says Dr. Revelyn Arrogante, Medical Director of Northern Colorado Rehabilitation Hospital. “They occur when blood flow and oxygen is cut off to an area of the brain, causing brain cells to die. This, in turn, affects the abilities controlled by that part of the brain. To get the most successful results for stroke patients, we use best practices and follow evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.”

Arrogante says by doing this, the hospital can provide patients with quicker recovery times, allow more patients to discharge to home, and help patients gain more physical and cognitive independence.

At the hospital, an interdisciplinary care team works with patients and their family members. They collaborate to create individualized treatment plans. These plans are designed so patients can progress at their own ability levels. The rehabilitation team includes specially-trained physicians, nurses, case managers, and occupational, speech, and physical therapists – among other medical professionals. Patients receive 24-hour rehabilitative nursing care and daily physician management.

After 25 days at NCRH, Marty discharged home with his wife. He still receives outpatient physical, occupational and speech therapy, and uses a wheelchair to assist him. His goals for the future are getting back to his hobbies of being a mechanic, riding his motorcycles, and remodeling his house. Perhaps most of all, he looks forward to spending time with his son and two grandchildren.